Posts tagged ‘fundraising’

Free to Breathe Yogathon

I am once again raising money for the Baltimore Free to Breathe Yogathon that takes place 4 weeks from today (specific details below). Last year, I lost my grandfather to lung cancer just two short months after he was diagnosed.

In last year’s yogathon, I participated as an individual, but this year, I am Team Captain of Team Charm City Yoga. This blog post explains a little more about Free to Breathe, about the Baltimore Free to Breathe Yogathon, and about Team Charm City Yoga.

Free to Breathe

Free to Breathe is the event series raising money for the National Lung Cancer Partnership, an organization that supports lung cancer research and awareness.

In a yogathon, or a yoga mala, yogis perform 108 sun salutations continuously. We unite as one to breathe together for a single purpose.

On November 4, 2012 at 1 pm at the Baltimore Hebrew Congregation, yogis from all over Baltimore will breathe together to raise awareness for lung cancer.

Did you know? Lung cancer is the number one cancer killer in the United States. In fact, it kills more people than the next 6 cancers combined. 27% of all cancer related deaths in the US are due to lung cancer.

Yoga and the breath are integrally connected. Yoga unites mind to body using the breath, so a yogathon is the perfect fundraiser for lung cancer, so says the Baltimore Free to Breathe Yogathon creator Elissa Sachs-Kohen, a Rabbi at Baltimore Hebrew Congregation.

Rabbi Sachs-Kohen reached out to Free to Breathe after her mother died of lung cancer. She brought the Yogathon to Baltimore in 2008, and has been an advocate for Free to Breathe ever since.

Team Charm City Yoga

This year several Charm City Yoga teachers have united to form Team Charm City Yoga to raise money collectively. We invite you to join our team and be a part of not only Charm City Yoga, but also a part of helping fund research for the most underfunded cancer.

That’s right: lung cancer is both the number one killing cancer and the most underfunded in research dollars.

Over the last four years, the Baltimore Free to Breathe Yogathon has raised over $75,000 and counting. Every dollar raised helps fund invaluable research and prevention.

Join Our Team

Today I ask that you consider helping Team Charm City Yoga. You can help in several different ways.

  1. Be a part of Team Charm City Yoga by joining our team.
  2. Donate to either my personal fundraising page, or Team Charm City Yoga‘s fundraising page.
  3. Join us on November 4th for the 108 sun salutations for a registration fee of $30.
  4. Or, simply share this blog, or our fundraising pages to help us raise money for Free to Breathe.

Yoga means “union”, so let’s unite as a team and raise money so that everyone can be Free to Breathe.

Details

When: November 4th, 2012 at 1 pm
Where: Baltimore Hebrew Congregation, 7401 Park Heights Avenue, tel: 410-764-1587

Thank you for your support!

Love,

~Amber

Remedies for Sore Muscles

Yoga Mala

On Sunday, I did a Yoga Mala, which is 108 sun salutations done in a row. This particular Yoga Mala was a fundraiser I did for lung cancer research. My grandfather died in August of lung cancer. Yogis call a fundraising Yoga Mala a Yogathon, like a marathon.

In today’s post, I am sharing pictures from the Yogathon. Also, below is an explanation of a sun salutation and why we perform 108, as well as remedies to combat muscle soreness from overexertion.

My Yogathon temporary tattoo on my hand. 🙂

My sign dedicating my 108 sun salutations to my grandfather.

Sun Salutation – Surya Namaskar

A sun salutation is a sequence of 9 breaths. In Sanskrit, a sun salutation is called Surya Namaskar.

There are many variations of sun salutations, but below is the sequence we practiced 108 times in our Yogathon.

Surya Namaskar A

  1. 
Inhale – Urdhva Hastasana (Upraised Hand Posture)
  2. Exhala – Uttanasana (Intense Stretch/Forward Fold)
  3. Inhale – Ardha Uttanasana (Half Intense Stretch/Half Forward Fold)
  4. Exhala – Chaturanga Dandasana (Four-Limbed Staff Posture)
  5. Inhale – Urdhva Mukha Savasana (Upward Facing Dog)
  6. Exhale – Adho Mukha Savasana (Downward Facing Dog)
  7. Inhale – Ardha Uttanasana (Half Intense Stretch/Half Forward Fold)
  8. Exhale – Uttanasana (Intense Stretch/Forward Fold)
  9. Inhale – Urdhva Hastasana (Upraised Hand Posture)

The Sacred 108

108 sun salutations sounds like a lot of work. Yes, it is really hard as it sounds. It took about 2 hours and 30 minutes to complete a Yoga Mala with this sequence.

A lot of people ask why we perform 108 sun salutations. The number 108 is a sacred number in yoga and in Hinduism. There are many explanations as to why this is.

The simplest explanation is that Hindu prayer beads have 108 beads strung together, along with one guru bead. The prayer beads are used to say a mantra 108 times, very similar to Catholic rosary beads.

Combating Muscle Soreness

It should go without saying that performing 108 sun salutations will cause overexertion of the muscles. There are several tricks I recommend to people when they have overly exerted their muscles.

The first trick I recommend is to eat potassium rich foods after the work out or practice, Some common potassium rich foods are bananas, tomato sauce, avocados, most legumes, and coconut water. Muscles cramp up when they lack potassium, so feeding the muscles potassium will prevent muscle cramping and fatigue.

Anyone who has ever worked out too hard, shoveled snow, or performed any other form of manual labor is familiar with muscle soreness and stiffness a day or two after the exertion. This muscle soreness is caused by a build up of lactic acid in the muscles.

The first way I recommend combating muscle soreness is to do some light working out. Warming the muscles back up with keep the muscles from feeling stiff, and movement will work the lactic acid out of the muscles.

Another trick is to take a warm bath in Epsom salts. Epsom salts have long been used as a remedy for sore, achy muscles.

The final recommendation I have is to use a tennis ball or a myofascial release foam roller to massage out the lactic acid in the aching muscles.

Some may have seen a myofascial release foam roller in the gym. It is a cylinder-shaped dense foam apparatus that is used to iron out muscle soreness. Personally, I massage my shoulders and arms with a tennis ball, and use a foam roller on my back and lower body to relieve muscle soreness.

I used all of these tricks on Sunday after the Yogathon to ease my sore muscles. The next time you have muscle soreness or stiffness due to muscle fatigue, see if these remedies work for you.

Love,

~Amber

P.S. My fundraising for lung cancer research continues through December 31, 2011. If you would like to make a donation, please click here. Thank you for your consideration to help fund research and to raise awareness for the number one killing cancer in America. Remember, not everyone who gets lung cancer is a smoker, but lung cancer research is the most underfunded cancer in the country because of that stigma.